• Research Center in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources

    InBIO Associate Laboratory

    Research Center in  Biodiversity and Genetic Resources
  • Research Center in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources

    InBIO Associate Laboratory

    Research Center in  Biodiversity and Genetic Resources
  • Research Center in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources

    InBIO Associate Laboratory

    Research Center in  Biodiversity and Genetic Resources
  • Research Center in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources

    InBIO Associate Laboratory

    Research Center in  Biodiversity and Genetic Resources
 
 

 

 

 

 

 
Pedro Beja
 
Position: Coordinating Researcher
Member Type: Researchers
Degree: PhD
Email: pbeja@cibio.up.pt
Address: CIBIO-InBIO, Universidade do Porto, Campus de Vairão, Rua Padre Armando Quintas, 4485-661 Vairão, Portugal
Groups: APPLECOL, TROPBIO

My research has focused primarily on the conservation biology of a range of vertebrates, with a special attention to the actual application of conservation research. Concurrently, I have also tried to explore the theoretical underpinning of applied conservation research, with the empirical testing of ideas and hypothesis in the areas of disturbance ecology, predator-prey interactions, spatial (meta) population processes, and population ecology.

 

In the past five years I have developed several research projects analysing the interaction between biodiversity and forest and agriculture management. Local and landscape processes influencing the persistence of species in agricultural landscapes were described and quantified for amphibians, birds and small mammals. These studies identified edge effects, predation and metapopulation processes as particularly important in Mediterranean agricultural landscapes, though poorly known, prompting the start of several ongoing studies addressing these themes in detail. In Mediterranean forest ecosystems, studies based on a range of biodiversity indicators (macrofungi, vascular plants, butterflies and birds) showed that a mosaic of forest patches with different management regimes is required to preserve biodiversity at the landscape scale. Globally, this line of research provided information relevant to the sustainable management of forest and agricultural ecosystems.

 

During the same period, a range of studies have focused on the conservation and ecological role of top predators, addressing themes such as predation, population ecology and genetics, and feeding ecology. Most of these studies are ongoing, but they have already produced valuable information from both the basic and applied standpoints. Particularly relevant is the long-term study of a population of Bonelli’s eagles (1992-2008) carried out with other researches, with recent research quantifying habitat requirements of one of its main prey, the interaction between feeding ecology and mercury contamination, the factors influencing predation on domestic prey, the importance of density-dependent processes to population dynamics and the role of breeding habitat selection on population genetic structuring.