• Research Center in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources

    InBIO Associate Laboratory

    Research Center in  Biodiversity and Genetic Resources
  • Research Center in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources

    InBIO Associate Laboratory

    Research Center in  Biodiversity and Genetic Resources
  • Research Center in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources

    InBIO Associate Laboratory

    Research Center in  Biodiversity and Genetic Resources
  • Research Center in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources

    InBIO Associate Laboratory

    Research Center in  Biodiversity and Genetic Resources
 

 

 

 
 
CHEETAHS: BIOLOGY AND CONSERVATION
Laurie Marker, Cheetah Conservation Fund | July 05, 2019 – 11h45 | CIBIO-InBIO’s Auditorium, Campus de Vairão
2019-07-05
 

CASUAL SEMINAR IN BIODIVERSITY AND EVOLUTION

 

Dr. Marker's talk will be centered around her 40+ years of research into the species and threats to its survival, including farmer-carnivore conflict, loss of habitat and prey base, fragmentation and illegal wildlife trade. Her talk will be a snapshot of her most recent publication, CHEETAHS: Biology and Conservation. The book brings together the work of 150 cheetah researchers and experts to form the most comprehensive text on the species. Dr. Marker was the lead author and editor, and she contributed multiple chapters.

 

Dr. Laurie Marker is an American research scientist, conservation biologist and agriculturist recognized as one of the world’s leading experts in human-carnivore conflict. In 1990, Dr. Marker established Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF) and set up its international base in Otjiwarongo, Namibia. Under her leadership, CCF has grown into a world-class institution dedicated to research, education and conservation of the cheetah and its ecosystem. Dr. Marker’s rigorous scientific research, creative conservation programs, and unique holistic philosophy have gained her the respect of the worldwide community. The vital information she has assembled on cheetah health, reproduction, ecology and genetics has proven invaluable in the management of cheetahs on Namibian farmlands. In Namibia, more than 90 percent of country's cheetah population - the world's largest - live on open farmlands and hunt by day. Dr. Marker was an early proponent of the conservancy movement in Namibia, serving as Chair and Vice Chair of the Conservancy Association of Namibia (CANAM) for over eight years. CANAM promotes integrated livestock and wildlife management and the sustainable use of natural resources that allows for predators on the land and generates additional revenue from ancillary income streams, such as ecotourism. Dr. Marker earned her DPhil in Zoology from the University of Oxford in the UK. She has published more than 100 scientific papers in peer-reviewed journals and is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. In 2015, she was recognized with an Eleanor Roosevelt Val-Kill Medal Award, an E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Technology Pioneer Award, and the Ulysses S. Seal Award for Innovation in Conservation. In 2014, she was named an A.D. White Professor-at-Large with Cornell University. Dr. Marker has been awarded the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement (2010), The Tech Museum of Innovation’s Intel Environmental Prize (2008), and is a two-time finalist for the prestigious Indianapolis Prize. In 2000, she was named a “Hero for the Planet” by TIME Magazine. Dr. Marker has been featured in Smithsonian, National Geographic, Discover, and The New York Times, and in many cable television series and wildlife documentaries shown around the world.

 

 

 

[Host: Pedro Monterroso, Conservation Genetics and Wildlife Management]

 

 

 

Image credits: John Bowers