• Research Center in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources

    InBIO Associate Laboratory

    Research Center in  Biodiversity and Genetic Resources
  • Research Center in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources

    InBIO Associate Laboratory

    Research Center in  Biodiversity and Genetic Resources
  • Research Center in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources

    InBIO Associate Laboratory

    Research Center in  Biodiversity and Genetic Resources
  • Research Center in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources

    InBIO Associate Laboratory

    Research Center in  Biodiversity and Genetic Resources
 
 

 

 

 

 

 
Sasha Marques de Vasconcelos
 
Position: PhD Student
Member Type: Students
Degree: MSc
Email: sasha.vasconcelos@cibio.up.pt
Address: CIBIO-InBIO, Instituto de Investigação Científica Tropical, Trav. Conde da Ribeira 9; 1300-142 Lisboa, Portugal
Groups: APPLECOL

My main research interests include conservation biology and community ecology, with a focus on arthropods in Mediterranean and tropical ecosystems.

 

From 2012 to 2016, I worked as a research fellow under the partnership between CIBIO-InBIO and the former Tropical Research Institute in Lisbon (IICT), where I conducted the taxonomic revision and databasing of extensive Mozambican butterfly collections. In that time I also collaborated in two FCT research projects. In the first, CajuGB (PTDC/AFR/117785/2010), I examined the influence of expanding cashew monocultures in West Africa (Guinea-Bissau) on butterfly communities, and in the second, EDGES (PTDC/BIA-BIC/2203/2012), I have specifically looked at the impacts of EU-funded afforestation schemes on insect communities in Mediterranean open farmland.

 

At present, I am working on my PhD thesis titled “Linking agricultural management, host-parasitoid interactions and natural pest control in Mediterranean olive farms: a molecular-based food web approach”. With this research I intend to understand how the interactions between olive tree pests and some of their primary controllers (parasitoid wasps) are influenced by agricultural management practices, using a molecular approach to reconstruct trophic networks.